HomeDiscussionsFamily PlanningFP INFOcusImproving Youth Sexual and Reproductive Health Through Digital Storytelling

16 replies, 3 voices Last updated by Profile photo of David Adewoye David Adewoye 1 week, 4 days ago
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  • #92630
    Profile photo of Cori Fordham
    Cori Fordham
    Moderator

    Storytelling is an incredibly powerful tool for social and behavior change. It inspires people to view a topic in a new way or motivate them to make a positive change in their lives. Traditionally, storytelling has been done through face-to-face conversations. However, increased access to mobile phones and social media has changed the way that people can share and hear stories, as well as expanded the number of people reached by one person’s story.

    On Wednesday, August 23 from 9:00 – 10:00 AM EDT, HC3 conducted a webinar featuring experiences of young sexual and reproductive health (SRH) champions who have used storytelling to mobilize others around the topic. Speakers gave tips for making quality and engaging videos and positively interacting with viewers. HC3 also launch its newly developed FP INFOcus Guide, which provides step-by-step guidance for producing and promoting mobile phone videos that give young people the information they need to make informed contraceptive choices. 

    We encourage you to post your questions and experiences about the FP INFOcus Guide and using digital storytelling to improve youth SRH in general. We look forward to hearing from you!

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  • #92632
    Profile photo of Cori Fordham
    Cori Fordham
    Moderator
    @corifordham

    Click here to read an article to learn more about the FP INFOcus Guide and HC3’s collaboration with HACEY. Then check out their Facebook page to see the final product!

  • #92862
    Profile photo of Cori Fordham
    Cori Fordham
    Moderator
    @corifordham

  • #92863
    Profile photo of Cori Fordham
    Cori Fordham
    Moderator
    @corifordham

  • #92864
    Profile photo of Cori Fordham
    Cori Fordham
    Moderator
    @corifordham

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 6 days ago by Profile photo of Cori Fordham Cori Fordham.
  • #92866
    Profile photo of Cori Fordham
    Cori Fordham
    Moderator
    @corifordham

    We received many questions during the webinar about cost and time of making mobile phone videos. What is your experience with this?

    • #94172
      Profile photo of David Adewoye
      David Adewoye
      Moderator
      @avidmaverick

      In my experience, the only costs you incur when you are shooting with mobile phones is just on transportation to the places you are shooting and probably snacks for your team, making the process very cost-effective. As regards time, it depends on how long the videos are. If you are shooting 3-5 minute videos, shooting will probably take about 2-3 hours depending on how well your subjects speak and budgeting about 5-10 hours for the total editing process, including getting feedback from team members.

  • #92867
    Profile photo of Cori Fordham
    Cori Fordham
    Moderator
    @corifordham

    We had some questions around specific populations (e.g., 18-24 year olds, under 18, rural, refugee populations) with mobile phones. Which populations have you tried to reach using digital technology or storytelling? What lessons did you learn throughout the process?

  • #92868
    Profile photo of Cori Fordham
    Cori Fordham
    Moderator
    @corifordham

    Do you have any experience promoting videos outside of social media (e.g., community events, face-to-face interactions, etc.)

  • #92869
    Profile photo of Cori Fordham
    Cori Fordham
    Moderator
    @corifordham

    Marquez asked “I am interested in how others are thinking about balancing buzz-worthiness and sexual and reproductive health topics. Who is watching and why? Do they find these video compelling, and how do we know? Who is writing the research on these methods speaking to their effectiveness?”

  • #92870
    Profile photo of Cori Fordham
    Cori Fordham
    Moderator
    @corifordham

    Marquez asked “I am interested in how others are thinking about balancing buzz-worthiness and sexual and reproductive health topics. Who is watching and why? Do they find these video compelling, and how do we know? Who is writing the research on these methods speaking to their effectiveness?”

  • #92871
    Profile photo of Cori Fordham
    Cori Fordham
    Moderator
    @corifordham

    Lou Kendaru shared the importance of prioritizing audio over video: “As a radio/podcast producer who has experience with video production too, I want to echo the importance of audio quality in video production for anyone here who is looking to produce video. Many people focus on visuals and use the built in microphone on the camera – often missing the storyteller’s voice!”

  • #92872
    Profile photo of Cori Fordham
    Cori Fordham
    Moderator
    @corifordham

    We had some questions about monitoring the impact of health promotion videos. How have you measured or evaluated videos? What impact did you have?

  • #92873
    Profile photo of Cori Fordham
    Cori Fordham
    Moderator
    @corifordham

    What are your suggestions for dealing with the range of comments? How have you dealt with questions from encouraging viewers, as well as the “haters.” What do you do when people comment perpetuating rumors or misinformation?

    • #93862
      Profile photo of Daysha Edewi
      Daysha Edewi
      Moderator
      @Daysha

      What are your suggestions for dealing with the range of comments? How have you dealt with questions from encouraging viewers, as well as the “haters.” What do you do when people comment perpetuating rumors or misinformation?

       

      So at BF we have a “don’t look at the comments” attitude about dealing with the comments section. I don’t support that position entirely. I do know that the reason we are like that is because there can be a lot of horrible things said about people in the comment’s section that I wouldn’t consider constructive criticism. However, I think that it’s important to get a solid idea of how people are reacting to your content, and that while there can be haters, a lot of the time the comments can be constructive and provide important information on how to improve your next videos.

      What I like to do (especially when I am in my own videos) is have fellow producers that I trust go in and check the top few comments, and if it looks positive or constructive I’ll go in and read them. But if it’s a mixed bag, then they will screenshot and send to me comments that they think are valuable for me to see.

      So I would get into the mindset of seeing comments as a valuable tool for collecting data on how your videos are being received, but have systems in place for how you want to go about receiving that data (especially if you or someone you care about is going to be in the videos).

      • Have someone screen the comments to get the general vibe of the feedback; have someone ready to do comment checking/deleting if necessary
      • Have people you trust collect the good feedback as well as the constructive feedback.

      As far as misinformation goes, we will just leave a comment from the official YT/FB page and most times commenters will do the labor of upliking it so that it becomes the top comment. You can also have co-workers with accounts on those platforms go in and like it to help it build momentum to get to the top as well. You can individually comment, but that can become very time consuming depending on how big your audience is. So if you have a small audience, it might be worth it. But if you have a larger audience, then I think the first option would be your best bet.

      Hope that helps!

      • #94065
        Profile photo of Cori Fordham
        Cori Fordham
        Moderator
        @corifordham

        Thanks for sharing, @daysha. I really like the idea of having someone else that you trust comb through comments – that way you can engage with your viewers in a constructive without being overwhelmed by any spam/trolling comments.

        Yesterday, I spoke with one of the people working on East Los High, a serial drama on Hulu with storylines about adolescent sexual and reproductive health. She said many people react to the show via social media – sometimes stating incorrect facts. East Los High’s social media team will respond with correct facts, but only after giving viewers time to respond. In most cases, one of the viewers will step in with real facts (proof the show is working!) She said the user-centered nature of social media conversations make the discussion feel more genuine.

        To learn more about East Los High, click here.

  • #92874
    Profile photo of Cori Fordham
    Cori Fordham
    Moderator
    @corifordham

    Have you ever used storytelling to promote health? Tell us!

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